Exhibition: Twin Bed

Julia Rommel Twin Bed Bureau at Tanya Leighton, Berlin September 4 - October 6 2018

A large abstract painting on a white wall with gray floor below. The painting is a combination of discreet abstract shapes painted in bold colors. The outstanding colors are a hue of purple, red, blue, yellow and white. The paint is thick and brushy and the canvas is rough with creases.
Press:

Flash Art

Bureau and Tanya Leighton Gallery are pleased to announce a gallery swap this September and the debut solo shows by Julia Rommel and Jonas Lipps. Twin Bed, Rommel's first one-person exhibition in Germany will comprise seven new works at Tanya Leighton's gallery at Kurfürstenstraße 24/25.

I tried to be more decisive when planning and starting these paintings, but they quickly strayed away from any plan, and ended up needing so much trial and error, so many returns to chance methods, so many layers, so many color insights from the outside world, for anything of real interest to come through. In short, a lot of chaos entered in before I could find the important parts and see the way to the slightly simplified end. I had an original goal of presenting a newness by way of elements being quick and thin and light — but that did not work out. The paint became thick, and I had to find a way to create life within this thickness. The paintings brought forth their own, new pace, even if the easy, early marks were long-gone.

This year, I have been determined to make conscious changes towards what I think I want in my personal life, and that also has not worked out — I have learned that I can not force these things. In retrospect I should have known that I was trying to control too much. Mostly I've been swamped by just keeping up with each day, trying to get my work done, and absorbing the sadness coming in from the external world. However, moments of openness have also floated to the surface, surprising me. The painting titles are pulled mostly from the good experiences within these moments. And the colors too, I think, come from these experiences. Stubbornly, they all became bright paintings, despite my original plans to make them otherwise. The truth is, I've had a lot of fun this year. The fun, and happiness, has sneakily persisted despite my failures, and despite the news and analysis that constantly fills my ears while I'm working.

I've long been taking this lesson to my paintings: that good, lucky things happen because of (or despite) all the labor that sometimes feels so redundant, pointless, difficult. This is how it continues to play out for me. I wonder if I will ever have an idea or plan that I carry through to its foreseen conclusion. For now, that is not the way things work. What works, continuously, is the act of working itself, and locating the moments of unexpected luck within. - J.R. August 2018

Julia Rommel (b. 1980 in Salisbury MD, lives and works in New York) received her MFA from American University in Washington D.C. Her first solo museum show, Two Italians, Six Lifeguards, was hosted by the Aldrich Museum, Ridgefield, CT in 2015. Recent solo and two-person exhibitions include: Stay-at-Home Dad with Mathew Cerletty, Standard (Oslo), Oslo, Norway; Man Alive, Bureau, New York; A Cheesecake With Your Name On It, Overduin & Co., Los Angeles, CA, 2016. Recent group exhibitions include Painting/Object, The FLAG Art Foundation, New York, 2018; Zombie Formalism, ca. 1970/2016, Mitchell Algus Gallery, New York, 2016; Space Between, The FLAG Art Foundation, New York, 2015. Her work is in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Albright Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo; Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; and the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis.

In a gallery space, two large abstract paintings hung on separate walls. The paintings are formally dominated by large rectangular blocks of color. The most striking colors in both paintings are a range of reds, pinks, and blues. The paint is very thick and the canvas is rough.
In a gallery space, two large abstract paintings hung on separate walls. The paintings are formally dominated by large rectangular blocks of color. The most striking colors in both paintings are a range of reds, pinks, and blues. The paint is very thick and the canvas is rough. In an additional room in the background are three smaller paintings that are yellow, pink, and green.
A large abstract painting on a white wall with gray floor below. The painting is a combination of discreet abstract shapes painted in bold colors. The outstanding colors are a hue of reds, blues, pinks and greens. The paint is thick and brushy and the canvas is rough with creases.

Ex-Husband, 2018, oil on linen, 84 × 83 in.

A large abstract painting on a white wall with gray floor below. The painting is a combination of discreet abstract shapes painted in bold colors. The outstanding colors are hues of red, pink, blue, and green. The paint is thick and brushy and the canvas is rough with creases.

Fancy Cherries, 2018, oil on linen, 80 × 69 in.

In a gallery space, three abstract paintings hung evenly spaced apart. The paintings are formally dominated by rectangular blocks of color. The paint to the left is a yellowish-green. The smaller painting in the middle is primarily pink. The painting on the right is a hue of pink, green, and blue. The paint is very thick and the canvases are rough.
A medium-sized abstract painting on a white wall The painting is a combination of discreet abstract shapes painted in bold colors. The outstanding colors are a hue of yellowish-green and soft blues. The paint is thick and brushy and the canvas is rough with creases.

Happy Camper, 2018, oil on linen, 39 × 30 in.

A small abstract painting on a white wall. The painting is a combination of discreet abstract shapes painted in bold colors. The outstanding colors are hues of pink, red, and blue. The paint is thick and brushy and the canvas is rough with creases.

Senior Year, 2018, oil on linen, 18 × 13 ½ in.

An abstract painting consisting of four dominant and separated blocks of color. The rectangular shapes are separated by creases or folds in the canvas. The most striking colors are shades of blue, green, red, and pink. The paint is thick.

Suburban Kids, 2018, oil on linen, 39 × 31 in.

In a gallery space, two large abstract paintings hung on separate walls. The paintings are formally dominated by large rectangular blocks of color. The most striking colors in both paintings are a range of reds, pinks, blues, and yellows. The paint is thick and the canvases are rough.
In a gallery space, two large abstract paintings hung on separate walls. The paintings are formally dominated by large rectangular blocks of color. The most striking colors in both paintings are a range of reds, pinks, blues, and yellows. The paint is thick and the canvases are rough. In the background is a smaller blue and pink painting.
An abstract painting consisting primarily of a rectangular block of dark-blue paint. There are stripes of roughly painted pink and aqua paint. There is a dark black strip along the right edge. The paint is thick.

Floater, 2018, oil on linen, 21 × 19 in.

Photography by Gunter Lepkowski.