untitled Arrangement Tom Holmes, Kyung-Me, Brandon Ndife, Christine Rebet, Julia Rommel June 26 - August 6 2021 Summer hours: Tuesday - Friday 11 - 6 p.m.

Bureau is pleased to present untitled Arrangement, a group show featuring Tom Holmes, Kyung-Me, Brandon Ndife, Christine Rebet and Julia Rommel. 

The exhibition title is borrowed from the paintings presented by Tom Holmes. Holmes’s reference to arrangements broadly stems from a set of categories that Holmes has used over many years to title works according to a kind of funerary index of urns, plots, reliquaries, or in this case floral arrangements. In one of these untitled Arrangements, Holmes paints an impressive rendering of colorful bell-like paper flowers, which bloom in a field of abstract gestures. In a second painting a vase of red angel’s trumpet sits next to a Tweety bird mug, their faint reflections echoing below. The blue-black surface of the table consumes most of the canvas as the image collapses into gesture towards its perimeter. 

Kyung-Me’s meticulous pen drawings depict placeless interiors void of inhabitants. These empty rooms are filled with ornate millwork and furnishings rendered in perspective, hatched and cross-hatched with intensity. The precise symmetry in Siamese VII is broken by a Victorian footstool, bearing an embroidery of Elijah and the ravens, displaced as if a body hurriedly exited the scene. There is an eeriness— a sense of confinement in the work, the colorless vignette leading to an architectural maze with no clear exit. 

Brandon Ndife’s sculptures feel primordial; muck sloshes at the edge of a cabinet drawer as tuber-appendages rise upwards from their bed of compost. The tidy wooden exterior houses a soil bed nearly bursting from its container. Though convincing as real, Ndife’s objects are made to mimic a seismic event, appearing crafted by the Earth or dredged from the sea. In Nantucket, wooden planks swell and crack as if inundated with saltwater, a vegetal growth emerges on its surface. These excavations hang as reminders, or warnings, of uncontrollable forces. 

In a film by Christine Rebet a metamorphosis plays out on screen: feet in sandals become claws, wings, hoofs, then mechanized; mountains rise and collapse, their trees throb like vascular systems. Rebet’s stop-motion animation follows a monk’s descent from a mountaintop to the sea, rendered in colorful ink drawings that capture the transformation of the landscape and spiritual transition of the monk. A voiceover narration, inspired by conversations with the philosopher Emanuele Coccia, ruminates on life’s transitive state. Accompanying the film are a series of ink drawings of related imagery, the sea, the mountains, the temple, static in comparison to the jittering screen. The images exist both in motion and in stasis, like our narrator’s envy of the caterpillar with its ability to pass from one existence to another without having to die.  

Julia Rommel’s canvases bear the history of their making. Their compositions are exhumed by the process, Rommel’s doing and undoing, folding and stapling, layer upon layer of gesso and paint. Hues bump against each other, delineated creases in the linen keep the pigment contained, a formal boundary drawn by a folded edge. In one work a thick off-white sheet of paint slides on its stretcher, the wooden corners exposed and painted to match. Bisected by a vertical crease, a field of peach washes over previous attempts at harmony; greens, blues and grays exposed at the canvas edge, innumerable paintings hidden underneath its final coat.

Tom Holmes (b. Ozona, Texas, lives and works in Cannon County and Jackson County, TN) received a BFA from the University of Texas, Austin and an MFA from the University of California, Los Angeles. Solo exhibitions include REALTREE® , Bureau, New York, 2019; L’EGGO MY EGGO®, Bureau, New York, 2017; Temporary Monument, Kunsthalle Bern, Bern, 2013. Holmes’s work is in the collections of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Stiftung Kunsthalle Bern, FRAC Bourgogne, and the Tang Museum at Skidmore College. The artist wishes to extend special gratitude to 100 W Corsicana, The Joan Mitchell Foundation, The Adolph & Esther Gottlieb Foundation, and CERF+.

Kyung-Me (b. 1991 Conyers, GA; lives and works in New York) received her MFA from the Yale School of Art. Solo and two-person exhibitions include Coniunctio with Harry Gould Harvey IV, Bureau, New York 2019; Poor Thing with Sydney Shen, Hotel Art Pavilion, Brooklyn, 2018; Theatre of Cruelty with Ashton Hudgins, Museum Gallery, Brooklyn, 2018. She is the author of Bad Korean, published by Spaceface Books 2016, and Copy Kitty, published by 2d Cloud, 2020.

Brandon Ndife (b. 1991 Hammond, IN lives and works between Brooklyn, New York and Jersey City, NJ) received a BFA from The Cooper Union and an MFA from the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts at Bard College. Solo and two-person exhibitions include MY ZONE, Bureau, New York, 2020; Minor twin worlds with Diane Severin Nguyen, Bureau, New York, 2019; Just Passin’ Thru, Interstate Projects, Brooklyn, 2016; Meanderthal, Species, Atlanta, 2016. He will participate in the 2021 New Museum Triennial, New York.

Christine Rebet (b. Lyon France, lives and works between Paris and New York) received her MFA from Columbia University and her BFA from Central Saint Martins School of Art and Design, London. Solo exhibitions include Time Levitation, Parasol Unit, London, 2020; Thunderbird, Bureau, New York, 2018; Paysage Fautif, Bureau, New York, 2015. Her work is in the collections of the Centre Pompidou, Musée d’Art Contemporain du Val-de-Marne, and KADIST. In 2021 she will have a solo exhibition at the Musée d’art contemporain de Lyon, France.

Julia Rommel (b. 1980 in Salisbury MD, lives and works in New York) received her MFA from American University in Washington D.C. Solo exhibitions include Long Leash, Overduin & Co., Los Angeles, 2020; Fall Guy, Standard (Oslo), Oslo, 2019; Candy Jail, Bureau, New York, 2019; Twin Bed, Bureau at Tanya Leighton, Berlin, 2018; Man Alive, Bureau, New York, 2016; Two Italians, Six Lifeguards, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, Ridgefield, 2015. Her work is in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, Albright Knox Art Gallery, Hammer Museum, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Walker Art Center.

In a gallery space, four cartoon-like handmade drawings are hung in white frames evenly spaced apart. The most commanding colors are hues of greens, blues, reds, and purples. On the right wall is an a sculpture housing a mixture of forms inside of a cabinet shelf hung on its side.
On a white wall, a wall sculpture depicts a bird's-eye view inside a wooden cabinet drawer. Inside is a mixture of cast forms protruding out from the drawer. The inside is painted a dark brown resembling organic material.

Brandon Ndife, Nipped at the Bud and Yet?, 2021, birch plywood, aluminum, earth pigment, enamel, cast foam, AquaResin, 17 ¾ × 13 × 11 in.

On a white wall, a wall sculpture depicts a bird's-eye view inside a wooden cabinet drawer. Inside is a mixture of cast forms protruding out from the drawer. The inside is painted a dark brown resembling organic material. The side of the sculpture is painted green and has a white knob.
On a white wall, a wall sculpture depicts a bird's-eye view inside a wooden cabinet drawer. Inside is a mixture of cast forms protruding out from the drawer. The inside is painted a dark brown resembling organic material. The left side of the sculpture is raw wood.
In a gallery space, four cartoon-like handmade drawings are hung in white frames evenly spaced apart. The most commanding colors are hues of greens, blues, reds, and purples.
A cartoon-like handmade drawing in a white frame. The drawing is rendered in a range of blues and greens depicting an abstract, crab, croissant, ear, and other geometric shapes.

Christine Rebet, The Geometers, 2019, ink on paper, 15 ¾ × 11 ¾ in.

In a white frame, a handmade drawing depicting an abstract wave of color resembles pearls and curves of color. The dominant colors are hues of red and green.

Christine Rebet, Pearls and Curves, 2019, ink on paper, 15 ¾ × 11 ¾ in.

In a white frame, a handmade serious of cartoon-like drawings, depicting vague forms such as a fan and a temple. The dominant colors are hues of green, blue, red, and purple.

Christine Rebet, Temple, 2019, ink on paper, 15 ¾ × 11 ¾ in.

In a white frame, a handmade cartoon-like drawing depicts an abstracted boat. The dominant colors are hues of red and blue.

Christine Rebet, Barque, 2019, ink on paper, 15 ¾ × 11 ¾ in.

In the hallway of a darkened gallery space a digital display monitor with a still image of red butterfly from an animation. In the background is a green, round wall sculpture on a white wall.
In a gallery space, a redish-green abstract painting is hung to the left. In the center a greenish wall hanging sculpture. To the right is an abstract painting with the head of a dog partially in view.
On a long white gallery wall, two abstract painting hung spaced apart. The paintings are abstract and feature blocked out colors in thick paint. The painting on the left is primarily off-white. The painting on the right is maroon and green.
A vertical abstract painting consisting of defined blocks of thick paint. The dominant colors are hues of off-white, pale pink, blue, and green. The canvas is rough and the separations of color are produced through folds and creases.

Julia Rommel, Oysters, 2021, oil on linen, 17 × 13 in.

A vertical abstract painting consisting of defined blocks of thick paint. The dominant colors are hues of maroon, bright green, and orange. The canvas is rough and the separations of color are produced through folds and creases.

Julia Rommel, Salisbury, 2021, oil on linen, 25 × 19 ½ in.

On a white wall, a rounded wall hanging sculpture consisting of numerous strips of irregular wood paneling painted green. To the left of the object is a cast vegetative-like protrusion.

Brandon Ndife, Nantucket, 2021, cast AquaResin, earth pigment, enamel, wood, rubber, 25 × 49 × 7 in.

On a white wall, a rounded wall hanging sculpture consisting of numerous strips of irregular wood paneling painted green. To the left of the object is a cast vegetative-like protrusion.
In a gallery space, three vertical paintings are hung evenly spaced apart. The painting contain gestural marks in bright colors next to representational forms such as an identifiable dog, flowers, and cups.
A vertical painting depicting a dog head, various flowers and numerous gestural marks.

Tom Holmes, untitled Arrangement, 2021, oil on linen, 48 × 30 in.

A vertical painting depicting a bouquet of flowers next to a small cup with cartoon-like bird eyes. The ground the painting contains many gestural marks in a black paint.

Tom Holmes, untitled Arrangement, 2021, oil on linen, 48 × 30 in

A vertical painting depicting numerous bell shaped flowers in a range of bright pinks, reds, yellows, and blues. There is a large gestural mark in the white. The ground of the painting is raw canvas.

Tom Holmes, untitled Arrangement, 2021, oil on linen, 48 × 30 in.

In a gallery space to the left a vertical painting on raw canvas depicting a group of bell shaped flowers in bright colors such as reds and pinks. To the right a small black and white drawing in a white frame. There is a long hallway with a darkened projection receding into the background.
On a white wall in a white frame, a meticulously rendered ink and graphite drawing depicts a mirroring interior domestic space with a lavish couch and cabinetry on either side.

Kyung-Me, Siamese VII, 2021, ink, charcoal and graphite on Arches paper, 12 × 16 in.

In a gallery space, a vertical abstract painting on raw linen with bright areas of reds and pinks resembling flowers. On the center wall is a small black and white drawing in a white frame. On the right wall is a small monochromatic painting painted in hues of white and pink. In the background is a long hallway entering another gallery space.